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How To Use App Inventor With Arduino

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Note: This post is outdated. For a recent version see Getting Started with MIT App Inventor 2 and Arduino.

This project’s source file for the android app is outdated, because it was built using the old MIT APP Inventor Classic software, that is no longer supported. However, this project still works if you convert the files to the recent format here.

We also have other projects that you may find useful:

If you like Android Apps and Arduino take a look at our course: Android Apps for Arduino with MIT App Inventor.

How To Use App Inventor With Arduino

After so many requests, I’ve decided to create this quick tutorial! I hope you enjoy.

This will help you understand how App Inventor works and how it can interact with your arduino via bluetooth.

Watch this video tutorial


Download all my source code below

  • Arduino Sketch
  • BlueLED.apk
  • BlueLED Source files (for editing purpose)

Click here to download

Note: If you want to edit my app this is what you need to do: After you download this folder make sure you unzip it. Only upload the BlueLED.zip into App Inventor.

Parts Required

  • 1x Arduino Uno
  • 1x Bluetooth Module (for example: HC-05, click here to read my review here about this Bluetooth module)
  • 1x Smartphone (any Android will work, I’ve only tested with Samsung Galaxy Ace)
  • Android Application (you can download it in the next step)
  • 1x 220Ohm Resistor
  • 1x LED
  • 1x Breadboard
  • Jumper Cables

parts

Schematics

[Schematics]

 Tips:

  • You need to remove the RX and TX cables when you’re uploading the sketch to your Arduino.
  • Sometimes people connect the TX from the bluetooth module to the TX of the Arduino… that’s wrong and it won’t work. Make sure you connect it properly, the TX into RX and the RX into the TX.
  • If the HC-05 Bluetooth Module asks for a password, It’s ’1234′.
  • Before Testing my “BlueLED” app, test if you’ve made all the connections correctly. How you can do that? Simply enter numbers (’1′, ’0′) into your serial monitor and your LED should be turning on and off.

I hope you found this useful!

Do you have any questions? Leave a comment down below!

Thanks for reading. If you like this post probably you might like my next ones, so please support me by subscribing my blog and my Facebook Page.

P.S. You don’t have a Bluetooth Module yet? Read my review here about the one I’m using in this tutorial!

P.P.S. Check a Similar project made by me using MIT App Inventor. (Click here)

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